Project Engine Builds

PROJECT LS2, PART 3 (C)

PROJECT LS2, PART 3 (C)

Goodson reluctor ring installer jig is an absolute must for installing LS crank timing wheels. The Goodson tool indexes the ring via the 8mm hole in the ring face. The 8mm dowel is pictured here. It’s attached to a tang on the outside of the tool. An internal dowel in the tool engages into the [...]

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PROJECT LS2, PART 3 (B)

PROJECT LS2, PART 3 (B)

PISTON/ROD INSTALLATION With the cylinder bores wiped clean with a lint-free towel, apply a light coat of engine oil to the walls. After making sure that the connecting rod and cap saddles are clean and dry, install the rod bearings to the rod and cap and coat the exposed bearing surfaces with oil (I used [...]

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PROJECT LS2, PART 3 (A)

PROJECT LS2, PART 3 (A)

PROJECT LS2, PART 3 Assembly of the short block and cylinder head installation by Mike Mavrigian All photos by author INSTALLING THE RELUCTOR WHEEL The reluctor wheel features a series of teeth that provide crankshaft position signals via a sensor to the ECM. The wheel press fits to the rear of the crank, immediately forward [...]

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LS PROJECT, PART 2 (D)

LS PROJECT, PART 2 (D)

The side relief design provides additional clearance for the crank’s reluctor wheel. Without this added clearance, No. 8 piston would hit the reluctor wheel. Here’s an underside view that clearly illustrates the side relief/short pin design. Naturally, this also reduces reciprocating weight as a bonus. As you can see, the compression height resulted in the [...]

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LS PROJECT, PART 2 (C)

LS PROJECT, PART 2 (C)

A close-up of our bobweight card. Gressman centered each bobweight using an aluminum spacer. This ensures that each bobweight will be located in the exact center of each rod pin. Gressman spun our crank on his pro-ball balancer. Our Lunati crank is a high-quality, forged, non-twist steel unit featuring a 4.000″ stroke. As you would [...]

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LS PROJECT, PART 2 (B)

LS PROJECT, PART 2 (B)

All main studs are installed finger-tight, with just an added scooch to make sure they’re seated. The main caps slid on easily, with no stud splaying interference. Be careful when installing the main caps. Each cap is numbered for location, as is the block. Be sure to install caps with cap numbers on the same [...]

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LS PROJECT, PART 2 (A)

LS PROJECT, PART 2 (A)

LS PROJECT, PART 2 BLOCK PREP AND BALANCING by Mike Mavrigian all photos by author We swapped out the OE torque-plus-angle main cap bolts for a set of ARP studs. This will provide added strength and will eliminate wear on the block’s female threads during future servicing. I recently visited Gressman Powersports where Scott Gressman [...]

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PROJECT LS2, PART 1 (1C)

PROJECT LS2, PART 1 (1C)

While measuring our lifter bore diameters, they seem a bit on the tight side, so we’ll likely hone to size, but will wait until we have our lifters in hand to accurately determine lifter oil clearance. The LS blocks feature lifter bore locations that are recessed in these deep pocket areas. The OE plastic lifter [...]

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PROJECT LS2, PART 1 (1B)

PROJECT LS2, PART 1 (1B)

Our block arrived with OE powder metal pain caps and installed cam bearings. Our bores’ center distance measured 4.400″, which met the OE spec. This blueprint drawing shows cam-to-crank centerline as 124.08mm (4.885″) and deck height (crank centerline to deck) as 234.7mm (9.240″). The rear of the block features already-drilled and tapped bellhousing bolt holes [...]

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PROJECT LS2, PART 1 (1A)

PROJECT LS2, PART 1 (1A)

PROJECT LS2, PART 1 We examine the block. by Mike Mavrigian all photos by author Our new LS2 aluminum bare block was purchased from Scoggin-Dickey Parts Center. It arrived via UPS in a wood crate. THE BLOCK We’re starting this project build using a new LS2 aluminum block purchased from Scoggin-Dickey Parts Center. The LS2 [...]

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